Clinical Studies

Click on the following themes to go directly to the studies about:

The benefits of collagen supplements seem endless, but what do researchers say about this? Exactly what research has been done? We have investigated this and compiled the most important findings for you on this page. You can certainly read this for an answer to the question: How can using CelioGenix contribute to beauty and health?

Enjoy reading!

Scientist smiling.

Skin hydration & collagen density

The study “The effect of oral collagen peptide supplementation on skin moisture and the dermal collagen network” says that skin aging is noticeable, among other things, by a weaker collagen network in the middle skin layer and by a dry skin. Nutrition is seen as extremely important for a healthy and radiant skin. Clinical research on the relationship between the intake of collagen peptides and skin quality shows that:

  • The skin was much better hydrated after 8 weeks of daily peptide intake. After 12 weeks the results were even better.
  • The collagen density in the middle skin layer (the dermis) no longer deteriorated, but had greatly improved after 4 weeks and even better after 12 weeks.
  • Conclusion: taking collagen peptides effectively counteracts skin aging.

You can read the full study here.


Fish collagen for skin elasticity

The clinical study “Daily oral supplementation with collagen peptides combined with vitamins and other bioactive compounds improves skin elasticity and has a beneficial effect on joint and general wellbeing” looked at what a supplement containing fish collagen + vitamins + minerals can do for the texture and elasticity of the skin, joint health and general well-being. 120 people participated and took this supplement or a placebo every day for 90 days.

The results?

  • Skin: Skin elasticity improved with 40% more for those who took the supplement compared to those who took a placebo. The texture of the skin also improved a lot and the test subjects themselves felt that their skin looked and felt better (more hydrated + more elastic).
  • Joints: There was a positive outcome for joints as well. Joint pain decreased by 43% and mobility improved by 39%.

You can read the full study here.


Skin elasticity after 4 and 8 weeks

The subjects in the study “Oral supplementation of specific collagen peptides has beneficial effects on human skin physiology: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study”  took hydrolysed collagen or a placebo every day for 8 weeks. The amount of collagen per day was 2.5 grams or 5 grams. The goal? To investigate whether this would actually improve elasticity in the skin. The test moment after 4 weeks already illustrated that those who took a collagen supplement had a more elastic skin. This research therefore indicates that improvements can already by noticed after 4 weeks of taking a small amount. CelioGenix even contains 10 grams and many other ingredients.

You can read the full study here.


Marine collagen + antioxidants for skin elasticity

The combination of hydrolyzed marine collagen + antioxidants such as Q10 and selenium was also shown to work well for skin elasticity in the clinical study “Skin Antiageing and Systemic Redox Effects of Supplementation with Marine Collagen Peptides and Plant-Derived Antioxidants: A Single-Blind Case-Control Clinical Study“. Here, the subjects’ skin condition was measured 2 months before starting, just before starting and 2 months after taking the collagen product daily. The supplements with this combination of ingredients proved effective and safe: they improved the skin without the risk of oxidative damage (damage from the outside).

You can read the full study here.


Collagen to improve cellulite

Dietary Supplementation with Specific Collagen Peptides Has a Body Mass Index-Dependent Beneficial Effect on Cellulite Morphology” was not just about improvements of the skin structure in general, but very specifically about cellulite (those dimples in the skin) and whether collagen would help against this. More than 100 women with cellulite participated and took 2.5 grams of collagen peptides or a placebo daily. The measurements were taken after 3 and after 6 months. The answer? Skin texture improved and cellulite decreased for those who took the peptides daily. The cellulite of normal weight women improved better than the cellulite of overweight women. In both cases it made the skin structure healthier.

You can read the full study here.


Body composition & muscle strength

The study “Specific Collagen Peptides in Combination with Resistance Training Improve Body Composition and Regional Muscle Strength in Premenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial” focused on supplementation with collagen in relation to resistance training and muscular strength. 77 woman in the phase of life right before the menopause were test subjects for 12 weeks. They either received collagen peptides or a placebo every day during this period, and they worked out 3 times a week. Both groups gained muscle strength and fat-free mass, but the group that received collagen peptides did much better. Therefore, the conclusion is that taking collagen supplements can be beneficial when performing resistance training.

You can read the full study here.


Collagen for nails

The goal of the study “Oral supplementation with specific bioactive collagen peptides improves nail growth and reduces symptoms of brittle nails” was to investigate whether daily intake of collagen peptides could improve nail growth and reduce brittle nails. There were 25 test subjects and they took 2,5 grams of peptides every day for 24 weeks. After 24 weeks, the nail growth rate increased with 12% and brittle nails were reduced with 42%. 4 weeks after this period was a measurement to see if the improvements were still noticeable, and they were. The participants agreed with the conclusion that the peptides had improved their nail structure and appearance.

You can read the full study here.

Can’t get enough of reading the results of studies like these? Scroll down to the literature list for more inspiration.

General Information

Hydrolyzed collagen

Studies regarding the workings of collagen and the anti-aging effect on the skin and joints always refer to ‘hydrolyzed collagen’ or ‘peptides’. Therefore, it might be useful to understand what this means.

  • Denaturation: A collagen molecule is disassembled into separate protein structures.
  • Hydrolysis: These chains are then processed and broken down into smaller particles.

Hydrolyzed collagen peptides can be absorbed by our body and reach the right locations.

Hydrolyse van collageenmolecuul uitgelegd.

CelioGenix Beauty Drink

Skin Aging

Collagen is often offered as a solution for skin aging. There are two types: intrinsic and extrinsic skin aging.

  • Intrinsic concerns the natural aging process due to genetic factors. This process is fixed because we get older. This is therefore difficult to prevent and we look for healthy remedies to slow down this process and to age as gracefully as possible.
  • Extrinsic is about external influences. This aging process is therefore not fixed in the genes, but has to do with the world around us and our lifestyle. For example, UV radiation from the sun causes the skin to age, just like smoking and drinking alcohol.

Do you want to prevent visible skin aging and keep the skin healthy and supple? Then you will have to pay attention to both processes. Scientists generally test how collagen supplements can help against intrinsic skin aging.

Our body naturally loses more and more of the protein collagen: a process from within. External influences can also cause collagen formation to deteriorate.

In any case, researchers agree that the loss of collagen causes visible skin and joint aging, as it destroys structure and flexibility. Many studies show how taking collagen supplements have a positive effect on skin health. Some were explained above, but you can take a look at the list below for reading inspiration!


Literature

Asserin, J., Lati, E., Shioya, T., & Prawitt, J. (2015). The effect of oral collagen peptide supplementation on skin moisture and the dermal collagen network: evidence from an ex vivo model and randomized, placebo‐controlled clinical trials. Journal of cosmetic dermatology, 14(4), 291-301. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jocd.12174

Anatomie en fysiologie van de mens. L.L. Kichmann. Vijftiende herziene druk, Elsevier gezondheidszorg, Maarssen 2003. Huidinfo.nl “De Huid”. https://www.huidinfo.nl/h/huid

Shuster S, Black MM, McVitie E. The influence of age and sex on skin thickness, skin collagen and density. Br J Dermatol 1975; 93: 639–43. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2133.1975.tb05113.x

Chiara De Luca, Elena V. Mikhal’chik, Maxim V. Suprun, Michael Papacharalambous, Arseniy I. Truhanov, Liudmila G. Korkina, “Skin Antiageing and Systemic Redox Effects of Supplementation with Marine Collagen Peptides and Plant-Derived Antioxidants: A Single-Blind Case-Control Clinical Study”, Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, vol. 2016, Article ID 4389410, 14 pages, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/4389410

Czajka, A., Kania, E. M., Genovese, L., Corbo, A., Merone, G., Luci, C., & Sibilla, S. (2018). Daily oral supplementation with collagen peptides combined with vitamins and other bioactive compounds improves skin elasticity and has a beneficial effect on joint and general wellbeing. Nutrition Research, 57, 97-108. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0271531717311508

Proksch E, Segger D, Degwert J, Schunck M, Zague V, Oesser S. Oral supplementation of specific collagen peptides has beneficial effects on human skin physiology: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2014;27(1):47-55. doi: 10.1159/000351376. Epub 2013 Aug 14. PMID: 23949208. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23949208/

Maia Campos PMBG,Melo MO, Calixto LS, Fossa MM (2015) An Oral Supplementation Based on Hydrolyzed Collagen and Vitamins Improves Skin Elasticity and Dermis Echogenicity: A Clinical Placebo-Controlled Study. Clin Pharmacol Biopharm 4:142. doi:10.4172/2167-065X.1000142. https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/an-oral-supplementation-based-on-hydrolyzed-collagen-and-vitamins-improves-skin-elasticity-and-dermis-echogenicity-a-clinical-placebocontrolled-study-2167-065X-1000142.php?aid=58654

https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/pub/1226

https://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/pub/1221

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3003457/https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26362110/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12837047/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12837047/

Bello, A. E., & Oesser, S. (2006). Collagen hydrolysate for the treatment of osteoarthritis and 22(11), 2221-2232. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1185/030079906X148373

Zdzieblik, D., Oesser, S., Baumstark, M. W., Gollhofer, A., & König, D. (2015). Collagen peptide supplementation in combination with resistance training improves body composition and increases muscle strength in elderly sarcopenic men: a randomised controlled trial. British Journal of Nutrition, 114(8), 1237-1245. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition/article/collagen-peptide-supplementation-in-combination-with-resistance-training-improves-body-composition-and-increases-muscle-strength-in-elderly-sarcopenic-men-a-randomised-controlled-trial/9426E375742D094F91029FD0364815C4

Sangsuwan, W., & Asawanonda, P. (2020). Four-weeks daily intake of oral collagen hydrolysate results in improved skin elasticity, especially in sun-exposed areas: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Dermatological Treatment, 1-6. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09546634.2020.1725412

Kwatra, B. (2020). Collagen Supplementation: Therapy for Skin Disorders: A Review. World J. Pharm. Res, 9, 2504-2518. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Bharat-Kwatra/publication/341132150_COLLAGEN_SUPPLEMENTATION_THERAPY_FOR_SKIN_DISORDERS_A_REVIEW/links/5eb041fb299bf18b9594bc1a/COLLAGEN-SUPPLEMENTATION-THERAPY-FOR-SKIN-DISORDERS-A-REVIEW.pdf

Barati, M., Jabbari, M., Navekar, R., Farahmand, F., Zeinalian, R., Salehi‐Sahlabadi, A., … & Davoodi, S. H. (2020). Collagen supplementation for skin health: A mechanistic systematic review. Journal of cosmetic dermatology, 19(11), 2820-2829. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jocd.13435

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/11/4/892